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Autoimmune Conditions

Question:

Can a person with an autoimmune condition like Fibromyaglia benefit from eating a gluten free diet? I have noticed symptoms lesson when I do comply to eating gluten free foods and working towards adding superfoods to my daily diet. I may have a slight sensitivity, what do you think?

Elizabeth J.

salad

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Liz Schau’s Answer:

Going gluten-free can absolutely help an autoimmune condition. From the natural perspective, autoimmune disease is rooted in a condition called “Leaky Gut Syndrome”. A major contributor to Leaky Gut is the presence of food allergens in the diet. In order to slow the Leaky Gut process, and thereby ease the autoimmune process, getting off of food allergens is essential. For most people in the West, gluten will be the first allergen to get off, and dairy the second (because we are exposed to them so much).

Liz Schau, CHHC,

Liz Schau Holistic Health
1003 West Craig Place
(941) 932-5644
LizSchau@gmail.com

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Allison Ramsey’s Answer:

One of the symptoms of gluten intolerance is aching joints. Also, it fatigues people faster, lessens the immune system functions, all of which effect this condition. Eating super foods will up your energy. Contact me for some Maca which is a great super food for you, it gives a steady stream of natural energy, helps the body adapt to stress, and has many vitamins and minerals naturally accruing. Having a gluten free lifestyle will aide in immune function, lessen joint pain, increase memory, aide a person with a clearer mind.

Allison Ramsey, M.S.,

Vibrance Natural Medicine
Integrative Healing Institute
3300 Nacogdoches Rd, Ste 110
(512) 670-6079
vibrancenaturalmed@gmail.com

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Dr. Aaron Root’s Answer:

Even if one doesn’t have a verifiable gluten sensitivity or allergy, periodic avoidance of gluten can certainly reduce inflammatory “triggers’ that might sensitize autoimmune reactions.   Sometimes, the identification of absolute gluten sensitivity with specific tests is worthwhile, particularly when looking for hidden “cross-reactive” triggers involving different foods/proteins, where gluten might not necessarily be the primary culprit, but another food might be, where the immune system ends up reacting to many foods.  There are 2 tests that I know of for identifying these, and you can look at the information online: Cyrex Labs and Enterolab.  Both are different types of testing, but can give some definitive answers.  In the meantime, you might get plenty of “mileage” out of avoiding the most likely gluten(s), and you would know based on how you feel.

Dr. Aaron Root,

Aaron Root, DC, DACNB, Dipl.Ac, FACFN
Diplomate, American Chiropractic Neurology Board
Diplomate, International Academy of Medical Acupuncture
Fellow, American College of Functional Neurology

11120 Wurzbach Road
(210) 690-1333

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